1270 Fifth Avenue

1270 Fifth Avenue

Despite the urge to simply dismiss this beige box as the ugliest apartment building fronting Central Park, 1270 Fifth Avenue is actually historically notable for being the first middle-income co-op apartment building constructed in Manhattan under Section 213 of the National Housing Act, which authorized Government-insured loans to private developers of co-operative housing.  The act… Continue reading

1190 Fifth Avenue

1190 Fifth Avenue

1190 Fifth Avenue houses the Mt. Sinai Executive Health Program, one of the most celebrated such in the country – save, rather obviously, for architectural reasons.  A graceless hulk, it is connected to a vast and even unsightlier tower that stands behind it and which manages to completely disrupt the surrounding skyline.

1046 Fifth Avenue

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A brash and ugly intrusion into the district, 1046 Fifth Avenue has all the style of a discarded pair of cheap sunglasses. The building was completed in 1967.  Architects and developers shall go unnamed.

1025 Fifth Avenue

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This puzzling slot in the streetwall is explained by the desire of a developer to claim a Fifth Avenue address for a building actually located on 83rd and 84th Streets. Designed by H. L. Feldman, 1025 Fifth Avenue is accessed through the gap between 1020 Fifth Avenue and the mansions to the north, a solution… Continue reading

1001 Fifth Avenue

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A postmodern design by Johnson & Burgee, 1001 Fifth Avenue was widely criticized when completed in 1979 for its “billboard” façade and “sliced-off Tootsie Roll” fenestration (the latter crack coming from The New York Times’ architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable).  As a forerunner of the later and more celebrated AT&T Building by the same firm,… Continue reading

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